Archive for the 'Library stuff' Category

What #teamharpy is all about to me

Two of my colleagues are being sued for $1.25 million by someone alleging that his reputation has been damaged by their tweets and blog post which refer to his reputation for sexual harassment.

I find the lawsuit chilling, and I have joined many others in signing the petition calling on Joe Murphy to drop the lawsuit. Feel free to add your name.

I also am horrified and heartbroken when I think about the incredible financial and emotional burden of this lawsuit on the defendants, so I have donated to their defense fund. I hope others who are able to do so will donate as well.

To build a robust defense against the lawsuit, the defendants need witnesses willing to publicly testify as either primary witnesses, witnesses of an event, or character witnesses. If you are willing and able to do so, I encourage you to submit your name as a witness and help build a defense against this lawsuit.

So that’s what #teamharpy is about to me — two colleagues who are being sued for speaking their truth and who need our help and support. For me, right now, it is that simple and that urgent.

 

Bearing witness for #teamharpy

Two extraordinarily brave and talented colleagues of mine are being sued for speaking out about sexual harassment and they need and deserve the support of all of us who believe that victims of sexual harassment have the right to speak and to be believed. They need our financial support for their legal defense fund, and they need witnesses willing to testify.

Almost 20 years ago, I submitted a sworn statement that was part of the investigation that led to a highly decorated Army Colonel being removed from his appointment as a department chair at the United States Military Academy for sexual harassment and abusive leadership. I have some sense of how scary it can be to simply tell the truth and bear witness to the abusive, harassing behavior of those with power and privilege; and I stand in awe of those who have already come forward in the #teamharpy case.

In an interview with Colorlines, my very favorite sociologist Tressie McMillan Cottom talks about learning from her mother’s example about “the model of organizing where being a witness was an active thing to do.”

If you want to bear witness in defense of Lisa and nina, and in defense of the right of women to speak up about harassment without fear, you can do any or all of the following things:

  1. Donate to their legal defense fund.
  2. Come forward as a witness with whatever truth you have to tell.
  3. Help spread the word about this via your social networks (twitter: #teamharpy).

A thank you, a picture, and a call for witnesses

I had loads of fun helping to promote the #libs4ada fundraising drive, and am more than a bit amused to think that the promise of seeing me in a dress may have motivated a few extra dollars. I’m more than willing to make a fool of myself for a good cause.
If you missed the tweet with the actual #ButchInADress photo, here it is:

Butch in a dress

Butch in a dress

Huge thanks to all those who donated and/or supported the fundraising drive in some way. It was a delight to see librarians blow past all the goals and keep on giving. We really do have an amazing core of generous folks in this profession who care deeply about making libraries, technology, and library technology more inclusive, more equitable, and more welcoming; and are willing to support the work of the Ada Initiative in those efforts.

Another vitally important way to support women in our profession is to believe them, to support them, to back them up when they are brave enough to speak out about harassment. Lisa Rabey and nina de jesus are being sued for speaking out about harassment in the library community and are calling for witnesses. I hope those who can bear witness will do so.

“Dressing” for the cause #libs4ada

Librarians (and our friends) are amazing. In the first day of the #libs4ada Ada Initiative fundraising drive, we blew our original goal of $5120 out of the water.

Donate to the Ada Initiative

In all the excitement, I issued two “stretch” challenges:

  1. If/when donations reach $8192, I will post a photo of myself in a dress selected for me by my very fashionable daughter.
  2. If/when donations reach $15,000, twitter librarians can select a dress which I will wear for 10 minutes at the upcoming DLF Forum. Who knows? Maybe we can even “sell” selfies with me in said dress as an additional fundraiser.

So, if you think #ButchInADress might be fun/amusing/terrifying, give generously.
Y’all rock.

Chris in a dress

Young butch in a dress, Chris Age 4

This librarian supports the Ada Initiative

Donate to the Ada Initiative

The Ada Initiative supports women in open technology and culture through activities such as producing codes of conduct and anti-harassment policiesadvocating for gender diversityteaching ally skills, and hosting conferences for women in open tech/cultureMost of what we create is freely available, reusable, and modifiable under Creative Commons licenses.

If that isn’t enough to explain why I support the Ada Initiative and why I think other librarians should too, let me tell you just one story about how the Ada Initiative has been important to me.

A little over a year ago, I decided that I was not going to speak at or support any conference that did not have a code of conduct. Then, in a fit of bravada, I decided to ask my boss, the University Librarian, to issue a statement encouraging ALL of our librarians to take the same stance and to work with the professional associations they were involved with to adopt codes of conduct. Making my argument was easy, because the Ada Initiative folks had already compiled all the data and documentation, and examples. The boss said yes, and I know of several major conferences that have since adopted codes at least partially in response to advocacy from Stanford librarians. I am convinced that these conferences are now a little more welcoming to folks who might otherwise have felt less included and less safe. I’m proud of whatever small role Stanford Libraries may have played in that — and the groundwork done by the Ada Initiative made that possible.

The truth is, I don’t really do much tech myself, but I’m a leader in an organization and a profession that does a lot of tech, and that employs many women. I very much want library technology to be diverse, inclusive, and as equitable as we can possibly make it; and The Ada Initiative gives us the tools to move in that direction.

So I support the Ada Initiative, and I hope you will too. Please also help spread the word via the hashtag #libs4ada.
Donate to the Ada Initiative

Jobs for new MLS’s

I have written about how and why I value a subject PhD for some library jobs, and I have been known to get defensive when librarians question the commitment or values or whatever of non-MLS holding librarians.
At the same time (I am large, I contain multitudes), I think it is important that newly minted MLS’s have decent job opportunities. So I’ve worked hard over the last year to convert 2 jobs into entry-level librarian jobs, ideally suited for new MLS’s and/or early career librarians.

Note that Stanford Libraries “is committed to recruiting and hiring qualified women, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities.” Personally, I am committed to creating opportunities for librarians from groups who are underrepresented in librarianship.

I know 2 jobs make only a tiny dent in the problem of a severe job shortage for entry-level librarians, but it is a start, and it will make a difference for at least 2 librarians. Please help me spread the word about these 2 opportunities, and feel free to contact me if you want more information and/or are interested in applying.

Mentors, gender, reluctance: Notes from Taiga panel on leadership at ER&L

As part of Taiga’s efforts to engage in broader conversations with a wide variety of librarians and library communities, I agreed to be on a panel about Leadership at the recent ER&L conference in Austin TX (YeeHaw!). I had a great time with colleagues Damon Jaggars from Columbia University and Kristin Antelman for North Carolina State University both in planning for the panel and on the day of.

Below are my edited notes from my portion, where I talked about mentors, gender, and reluctance/skepticism about moving into formal library leadership positions.

When the 3 of us first starting planning this panel, part of what I volunteered to do is talk about talking about leadership … which sounds really meta, but is really just about how and when and why and with whom you might want to talk to about your interest in library leadership.

Everyone knows good mentors are important – and I want to put a plug in for informal mentors. Some organizations have formal mentorship programs and that’s great, but many successful leaders talk about the important role of informal mentors on their success.

How do you find an informal mentor or mentors?

My colleagues may suggest different strategies, but I’ve found that being active on social media and reading library blogs makes it easier for you to “meet” people whose work and/or career you want to emulate or at least who you might want to learn from. Interact, comment, RT, ask questions. Talk to speakers after talks, even if you don’t have a question – tell them what you liked about their talk, why it resonated. Then later, ask to have coffee w/ them.

You don’t have to formally ask them to be your mentor, but you can tell them what your career aspirations are and ask for some advice. Honestly, most of us are egotistical enough that we are flattered when someone asks for our advice.

But I’ll let you in on a little secret – it isn’t really any advice you get from formal or informal mentors that will pay off.  It is the connection you have made. The adage about it not being what you know but who you know has an element of truth in it. One of the most influential articles in sociology is all about the strength of weak ties. In that research Mark Granovetter shows how it is our weak ties, our acquaintances, not our closest friends or family members, who are most likely to help us get the best jobs. The connections we make at conferences and on social media are exactly the kinds of weak ties that will pay off in helping us find and get the next job.

(Insert abrupt transition here)

And now I want to talk about gender.

Women are less likely to express career ambitions than men, and whatever you think of the advice in Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In, the research she cites makes it clear that women are (in general, and mostly white women) less likely to engage in the kinds of behaviors and activities that promote their own career advancement, and no wonder …

There is ample research showing that ambition and/or engaging in a range of leadership behaviors (speaking first, speaking confidently, taking charge in leaderless groups) is more likely to be viewed harshly for women, but positively for men.

Sociologist Joan Williams has distilled a huge amount of the research on women and work into a summary of some basic patterns of biases that women face, along with some suggested strategies:

  • “Prove it again”: This pattern refers to the fact that women encounter harsher standards than men, and that women’s success is more likely to be attributed to luck than to competence. Some suggested strategies are for women (and male allies) to vouch for each other and to publicly praise and celebrate each other’s success. Williams suggests that women “form a posse”. Another recommendation is to engage in “gender judo” – that is to adopt a mixture of feminine and masculine behavioral styles. Gender judo is also the recommended strategy for mitigating the effects of “The Tightrope”.
  • “The Tightrope” refers to the fact that women are rarely seen as both competent and nice, so they are forced to walk a tightrope between the two, trying to hit just the right balance to ensure they succeed at work. An additional strategy suggested for this challenge is that women strategically say “no” to some of the “housework” tasks women are typically and disproportionately asked/expected to do (bring the snacks, remember the birthdays, etc.).
  • Another well-documented pattern of discrimination women face is “The Motherhood penalty” – women who are mothers are judged as less committed AND less competent than childless women & than fathers. Williams suggests that an effective strategy to counteract the assumptions behind The Motherhood Penalty is for individual women to be explicit about their own goals & family decisions – whatever they are — and when people question your commitment to either work or family or both, to respond that the choices you are making are working for you (assuming that they are).

Now, to be honest, – Despite the fact that there is apparently some research showing that these strategies are effective (I’m guessing especially for white, straight, cis-gendered women in professional jobs), I’m not super comfortable with the focus on individual rather than organizational or institutional responses to gender bias and other forms of inequity in our organizations.

But … institutional change is slow and hard. And I suspect some combination of individual, organizational, institutional, and societal level strategies is required. And, one potential strategy for making our organizations more inclusive is for more men of color, more women, more people from underrepresented groups of all kinds, to assume leadership. Especially if those people are committed to a more diverse and equitable profession and organization.

And that brings me to my final point – I want to finish this up by talking to those of you who don’t want to be in library administration – especially those of you from underrepresented groups – and people of color and even white women are underrepresented in leadership in libraries relative to their numbers in the profession.

How many of you want to be a “leader” in the library world but can’t picture yourself as an AUL/AD or other high-level administrative leader in libraries? How many have mixed or negative feelings about being a library administrator, and have no desire to ever be a UL? (Note: LOTS of hands shot up).

Do any of these reasons resonate? (Note: Lots of head nodding during this roll call of reasons librarians are reluctant about moving up into formal administrative leadership positions).

  • I don’t want to deal with all “the politics”
  • I don’t want to be “the man”
  • I don’t want to have to compromise my values
  • I could never handle all the bureaucracy and I don’t want to deal w/ budgets
  • I want to have a balanced life

And what I want to say is that I get that … I really do… and I’m not going to tell anyone to Lean In when they want to Lean Out. I say Lean whatever way you want … AND I want to leave you with this thought:

If all of you who don’t want to play politics, who don’t want power & influence to change your values, and who want to have a healthy work life balance shy away from leadership positions; it might mean that you are leaving the leadership of our profession in the hands of those who aren’t concerned about those things …

 

Bracket Challenge for racial equality – regular tournament

OK y’all, now that the field is set for the regular NCAA tournament, make your picks and join my group Mad4Justice. Entry fee is $10 (PayPal or email me for address to send check/cash), with 2/3 of the pot going to Community Change, Inc., a fantastic non-profit based in Boston and working on racial justice and equity. Enter as many brackets as you want — prizes for Best Thematic Brackets also. Trash talking encouraged.

If you want to join the men’s bracket pool, I have one of those going too.

My Stanford and my Duke teams are both #2 seeds – I got Stanford, Duke, Notre Dame and Maryland in the Final Four; with my Cardinal beating Notre Dame in the championship game.

Mad for racial justice and equity

March Madness is here, and this year I’m running a Bracket group to raise money for Community Change, Inc., a non-profit in Boston committed to promoting racial justice and equity. From their website:

Community Change was born out of the Civil Rights Movement and in response to the Kerner Commission which named racism as “a white problem.” CCI has done what few organizations are willing to do: shine a spotlight on the roots of racism in white culture with the intention of dealing with racism at its source, as well as with its impact on communities of color.

I know some of the folks working at CCI (in person and/or online) and I am in awe of the work they do and their commitment to it.

So here are the basics:

  1. I set up a Bracket Challenge group on ESPN for the men’s tournament (I’ll probably set one up for the regular tournament* when that bracket is announced later today–DONE). You have to register, but registration is free.
  2. Join the Mad4Justice Men’s group, and fill out your bracket before first game on Thursday.
  3. Entry fee is $10,and there is no limit on how many brackets you can fill out.
  4. If you are cool with using PayPal, just submit your $10 entry fee to me directly via PayPal.
  5. I’ll also accept cash or check for the entry fee – email me if you need a snail mail address to send your entry fee to.
  6. Winner gets 1/3 of the pot, bragging rights for the year, plus a special token to be determined by me. The rest of the pot goes to CCI.
  7. I’ll also come up with a prize for the Best Thematic Bracket – last year we had an ARL bracket, and an all HathiTrust bracket. I’m sure we’ll get some creative themes this year as well.

OK – let’s do this! Go Duke, Go Stanford!

* Y’all see what I did there?

Some research on gender, technology, stereotypes and culture

Leading up to the Leadership, Technology, and Gender Summit, my colleague-friend Jennifer Vinopal and I have been collecting sets of recommended readings to help frame the conversations. We tried to find readings that address most of the topics outlined in What are we talking about when we talk about Leadership, Technology and Gender, while also keeping the list to a reasonable length and making sure the readings were accessible to all. It is a great list.

Here are some additional recommended readings that did not make the list for LTG, but which I think are critical to understanding the scope of the challenges involved in tackling the problems of gender and technology. Most of them are paywall, which sucks.*

“Do Female and Male Role Models Who Embody STEM Stereotypes Hinder Women’s Anticipated Success in STEM?” Sapna Cheryan, John Oliver Siy, Marissa Vichayapai, Benjamin J. Drury and Saenam Kim Social Psychological and Personality Science 2011 2: 656 originally published online 15 April 2011 DOI: 10.1177/1948550611405218

Abstract
Women who have not yet entered science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields underestimate how well they
will perform in those fields (e.g., Correll, 2001; Meece, Parsons, Kaczala, & Goff, 1982). It is commonly assumed that female role models improve women’s beliefs that they can be successful in STEM. The current work tests this assumption. Two experiments varied role model gender and whether role models embody computer science stereotypes. Role model gender had no effect on success beliefs. However, women who interacted with nonstereotypical role models believed they would be more successful in computer science than those who interacted with stereotypical role models. Differences in women’s success beliefs were mediated by their perceived dissimilarity from stereotypical role models. When attempting to convey to women that they can be successful in STEM fields, role model gender may be less important than the extent to which role models embody current STEM stereotypes.

“STEMing the tide: Using ingroup experts to inoculate women’s self-concept in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).” Stout, Jane G.; Dasgupta, Nilanjana; Hunsinger, Matthew; McManus, Melissa A.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 100(2), Feb 2011, 255-270. doi: 10.1037/a0021385

Abstract
Three studies tested a stereotype inoculation model, which proposed that contact with same-sex experts (advanced peers, professionals, professors) in academic environments involving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) enhances women’s self-concept in STEM, attitudes toward STEM, and motivation to pursue STEM careers. Two cross-sectional controlled experiments and 1 longitudinal naturalistic study in a calculus class revealed that exposure to female STEM experts promoted positive implicit attitudes and stronger implicit identification with STEM (Studies 1–3), greater self-efficacy in STEM (Study 3), and more effort on STEM tests (Study 1). Studies 2 and 3 suggested that the benefit of seeing same-sex experts is driven by greater subjective identification and connected- ness with these individuals, which in turn predicts enhanced self-efficacy, domain identification, and commitment to pursue STEM careers. Importantly, women’s own self-concept benefited from contact with female experts even though negative stereotypes about their gender and STEM remained active.

“Math–Gender Stereotypes in Elementary School Children” Dario Cvencek, Andrew N. Meltzoff, Anthony G. Greenwald Article first published online: 9 MAR 2011 DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01529.x

A total of 247 American children between 6 and 10 years of age (126 girls and 121 boys) completed Implicit Association Tests and explicit self-report measures assessing the association of (a) me with male (gender identity), (b) male with math (math–gender stereotype), and (c) me with math (math self-concept). Two findings emerged. First, as early as second grade, the children demonstrated the American cultural stereotype that math is for boys on both implicit and explicit measures. Second, elementary school boys identified with math more strongly than did girls on both implicit and self-report measures. The findings suggest that the math–gender stereotype is acquired early and influences emerging math self-concepts prior to ages at which there are actual differences in math achievement.

“Ambient Belonging: How Stereotypical Cues Impact Gender Participation in Computer Science” Sapna Cheryan,Paul G. Davies, Victoria C. Plaut and Claude M. Steele. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology Vol. 97, No. 6, 1045–1060 DOI: 10.1037/a0016239

People can make decisions to join a group based solely on exposure to that group’s physical environment. Four studies demonstrate that the gender difference in interest in computer science is influenced by exposure to environments associated with computer scientists. In Study 1, simply changing the objects in a computer science classroom from those considered stereotypical of computer science (e.g., Star Trek poster, video games) to objects not considered stereotypical of computer science (e.g., nature poster, phone books) was sufficient to boost female undergraduates’ interest in computer science to the level of their male peers. Further investigation revealed that the stereotypical broadcast a masculine stereotype that discouraged women’s sense of ambient belonging and subsequent interest in the environment (Studies 2, 3, and 4) but had no similar effect on men (Studies 3, 4). This masculine stereotype prevented women’s interest from developing even in environments entirely populated by other women (Study 2). Objects can thus come to broadcast stereotypes of a group, which in turn can deter people who do not identify with these stereotypes from joining that group.

Other great resources include:
Women in Computer Sciences: Closing the Gender Gap in Higher Education from Carnegie Mellon University

Starting in 1995, we have engaged in an interdisciplinary program of research and action in response to this situation. The research effort has been to understand male and female students’ engagement — attachment, persistence, and detachment — with computer science, with a special focus on the gender imbalance in the field. Students in the study have been interviewed once per semester about their family and schooling history, experiences with computing, feelings and attitudes about studying computer science. The goal of the action component has been to devise and effect changes in curriculum, pedagogy and culture that will encourage the broadest possible participation in the computing enterprise.

In part as a result of our efforts, the entering enrollment of women in the undergraduate Computer Science program at Carnegie Mellon has risen from 8% in 1995 to 42% in 2000

Reading list for MIT Open CourseWare course “Gender and Technology”:

Course Description
This course considers a wide range of issues related to the contemporary and historical use of technology, the development of new technologies, and the cultural representation of technology, including the role women have played in the development of technology and the effect of technological change on the roles of women and ideas of gender. It discusses the social implications of technology and its understanding and deployment in different cultural contexts. It investigates the relationships between technology and identity categories, such as gender, race, class, and sexuality, and examines how technology offers possibilities for new social relations and how to evaluate them.

* If you need access to any of these articles for your personal non-profit, educational use, contact a librarian near you ;-)


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